WELCOME TO OUR TRIP TRUCK BLOGSITE. WHEN WE'RE ON OUR OVERSEAS TRIPS WE AIM TO POST A FEW PICS, RELAY SOME EXPERIENCES AND TAKE AN OCCASIONAL WITHERING STAB AT TRYING TO MAKE SOME SENSE OF THE WORLD.

TRIP POSTS APPEAR IN DATE ORDER WITH THE MOST RECENT FIRST BUT OLDER POSTS CAN BE ACCESSED IN A NUMBER OF WAYS - SIMPLY FOLLOW THE RELEVANT LINKS.

AS WELL AS MEMORIALISING TRIPS, OUR SITE ALSO OFFERS BRIEF INTRODUCTIONS TO US, OUR TRUCK, MY HAYNES MANUAL AND A FEW RESOURCES. WE HOPE YOU ENJOY YOUR VISIT!

RESOURCES

Here are a few resources that you'll hopefully find useful.

Valuation Tool

A question posed time and again is how much self-built campers are worth. The simple answer is there is no simple objective answer; they’re such individual things that they’re worth exactly no more and no less than someone is prepared to pay. What may be exactly the right base vehicle / overall size combination for one person may be totally useless for the next. Of course, the same applies for every single aspect of every single build; from layout to equipments spec, to construction techniques, to materials used; the permutations are effectively endless. But… with the accepted understanding that objective valuation is - at best - an imprecise science, the spreadsheet that can be downloaded via the link below at least gives a rough idea of reasonable starting points for negotiations for both sellers and buyers. The sheet is based on empirical data but is still being developed to reflect the increasing and shifting market. If you try it and have any suggestions for modification, please let me know.

Download the Self-build Valuation Tool here - NB that to work correctly, the sheet needs to be downloaded (ie not used online) and used in conjunction with a compatible spreadsheet program (such as MS Excel).

Contact

If you’d like to ask any questions about anything to do with our truck, overlanding trucks in general,or our travels; then you’ll easily find me (and lots of like-minded others besides) on this pleasingly civilised and informative forum: overlandingtrucks.com - except, that is, whilst we’re travelling!

Known T244 Faults

Though the T244 lends itself very well indeed to overlanding use, it’s not without known faults. An increasing number of owners report definite trends. Here are some of the more consistent issues:


Problem
Description
Solution
Cab-lock buzzer
A mysterious persistent warning buzzer in the cab accompanied with the dash-warning light (if the light is working) is usually the cab-lock switch (found behind the cab)
Fix or replace it - some also just by-pass it but, of course, it’s there for a good reason…
Cab-tilt rams
Seals in the hydraulic rams fail and make cab-jacking unreliable / impossible
Always use the correct hydraulic fluid (AeroShell 41 or equivalent)
The rams are not serviceable - but I know a man that can…
Clutches
The hydraulic side is prone to fail. Slave cylinders get gunged up and seals fail
To help ward off any problems, flush the system and renew clutch fluid
Dashboard air leaks
Hissing from behind dash or slow-to-fill air tanks
Behind the ‘glove box’ are numerous air valves. They sometimes leak but can usually be fixed by pushing back their collets, pulling out the pipe and neatly trimming a tiny bit off the end. If this doesn’t work, the 6mm ‘O’ ring within the valve will probably need replacing.
Digital odo / speedo
The LCD odometer failing to display, or scrambling gobbledegook, is common - as is intermittent operation of the speedometer
Replace the speedo/odo with a new unit
Some use a gps-based replacement instead
Exhausts
Mounts shake loose, brackets break, bell housing bolts shear, heat-shields self destruct and the flexible section splits
An OEM 'upgrade' using a solid section and new brackets is available, but a lighter silencer is probably a better solution
Front crank seals
Oil sprayed all over the front of the engine - and beyond - is a sure sign your front crank seal has gone
The seal can be replaced without taking the timing cover off but more success is likely if you replace the seal from the inside. Whilst in there - you might as well sort the ‘Killer Dowel Pin’
Front shock absorbers
Prone to fail, symptoms include weeping oil and reduced ride quality
Exact replacements are very difficult to find, similar items are potentially the only viable option
Fuel delivery
The standard plastic fuel lines utlise a series of 4 push-fit connections, these are unfit for purpose and can lead to introduction of air into the fuel lines, which will almost certainly - at some point - lead to a breakdown
Replace all of the push-fit fittings and plastic pipework immediately
Use proper compression fittings and good quality pipe from any hydraulic hose specialist
Gun-hatch leaks
If water leaks in from the hatch area it’s likely to be getting past the rivnuts that are set into the hatch-mounting aperture. They are visible if you look under the rim from outside
Seal them with Sikaflex and all will be well
Killer dowel pin
A very rare but potentially fatal problem usually associated with tuned engines
Add a bracket or similar to hold it in place, an internet search will quickly show you how
Mudwing rot
A poor (twin plate) design around the rear mounting bracket area means water / salt / mud is collected; whereupon it rots the wings at will
New wings are hard to find and expensive
If repairing them, grind off the outermost part of the rear bracket and double-skinned plate, it’s not required for support and removing it eliminates the worst of the dirt / water traps
Propshaft UJs
Prone to failure, probably due to acute angles of operation
Keep them greased and keep an eye on them
Stalling
In a ‘perfect storm’ of the alternator and power steering pump dragging down engine revs, coupled with a closed throttle and the air compressor in full chat, the engine can stall
Simply raise tickover a bit using the appropriate bolt on the fuel pump (different on the Lucas and Bosch pump).
Throttle springs
They break
Rather than just replace them, include a link so that the spring isn’t so extended, this reduces fatigue
Tracta joint seals
They weep and changes in ambient temperature influence / exacerbate the issue
Unless they are really bad it’s not worth replacing them, simply keep the hub topped up with EP90 or SAE80W/90
Transfer-box lock
After engaging the lock it frequently sticks in and won't release, even after 'shuffling' back-and-forth
Usually, you can manually tap / push the actuator back up
Regular engagement / disengagement will help ward off sticking
Wheel wobble
Wheels wobbling whilst driving
New good quality tyres help, as does paying close attention to careful and well-lubricated tube and liner mounting, ensuring that tyre beads are properly seated on the rims. Switching wheels to different corners may help. If all else fails, try dismounting tyres, moving them through 90 degrees and remounting
Windscreen seals
They leak and can lead to rusted out cab floors
New rubbers are hard to source but Arbomast sealer provides a reasonable work around
You may need to dig old sealer out and re-apply it from time to time